Tag Archives: spectrum analyzer

US DOMINATES USED TEST EQUIPMENT MARKET AT 90%!

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US DOMINATES USED TEST EQUIPMENT MARKET AT 90%!


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According to Used-Line Research US DOMINATES USED TEST EQUIPMENT MARKET AT 90%! Click To Tweet

What’s behind this astronomical growth and what does it mean for the rest of the world?

As we come to the close of a successful 2015 sales year, we at Used-Line want to share some of our market observations and projections with you, our valued customers.

Used Test Equipment Market Snapshot.

A simple look at the Used-Line Dealers Directory shows North America as the most dominant of the 5 major global markets today by far, with over 70% of our dealers embedded and handling 92% of the products listed.

Used-Line Dealers Directory shows - 70% of North American dealers handling 92% of the products listed Click To Tweet

Europe, handling 6.2% of products, is a very distant second, followed by Asia, Oceania and the rest of the world.

Why is the US Market Growing?

America is experiencing a period of economic growth. The Bureau of Economic Analysis estimates the real gross domestic product (GDP) for 2015 increased at an annual rate of 2.1 percent in 2015 Q3. Employment was up, as well as personal income (up 0.9%) and market optimism translated into higher buying power.

A $4.13 Billion Growth Market

MarketsandMarkets consulting predicts the automated test equipment market will reach $4.13 Billion by 2020, fueled by an increased demand for consumer electronics, more complex designs and a growing need for more effective testing.

But even with the US occupying such a big chunk of the market, other regions are still dealing with a potential market of close to half a billion dollars.

MarketsandMarkets predicts the automated test equipment market will reach $4.13 Billion by 2020 Click To Tweet

But what does the future look like for these smaller markets?

Growth Potential for Other Regions

Despite their relatively small share of the used test equipment market, smaller markets have also grown.

used test equipment market
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The Asia used test equipment market, which only had 7% dealer representation a few years ago, now has 14.7%.

The Asia used test equipment, which only had 7% dealer representation a few years ago, now has 14.7%. Click To Tweet

Wireless network expansion in Asia and future developments on the planning boards mean future market growth opportunities. Plus the implications of the recent Climate Change conference in Paris mean a whole new restructuring of global industry of which Asia and other small markets will be scrambling to take advantage.

In other words, the market could grow even more than analysts estimate.

Used-Line will be keeping a close eye on this and other trends in Used Lab, Test, Measurement and Semi Equipment Market and let you know what we see in future updates.

We at Used-line will continue to do everything we can to connect you to the used test equipment market bringing you the latest news, market reviews and analytics to help you take advantage of the market.

Established 16 years ago, Used-Line has grown to become an acknowledged leader in the field of Used Lab, Test, Measurement and Semi Equipment with over 775 used equipment dealers worldwide, over 300,000 trusted used equipment listings and hundreds of thousands of customers,.

Used-Line connects thousands of new buyers and sellers of quality used and new high-tech and scientific equipment every month.

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Used-Line Statistics: Most Requested Equipment in November 2014

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  • E5071C ENA ⇒ Agilent (Keysight) ⇒ Network Analyzer
  • CMA3000 ⇒ Anritsu ⇒ All-In-One Field Tester
  • E4440A ⇒ Agilent (Keysight) ⇒ Spectrum Analyzer
  • N9010A EXA ⇒ Agilent (Keysight) ⇒ Signal Analyzer
  • 805C ⇒ Agilent HP ⇒ Slotted Line
  • TDS1012B ⇒ Tektronix ⇒ Digital Storage Oscilloscope
  • 85052B ⇒ Agilent (Keysight) ⇒ Standard Mechanical Calibration Kit
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Handheld Spectrum Analyzer Competes with Benchtops

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Frequency coverage from the Anritsu MS2720T gets as good as 9 kHz to 43 GHz in model MS2720T-0743, the high end of this series of spectrum analyzers, which starts at its lower end (in terms of frequency) with a model that boasts a continuous frequency range of 9 kHz to 9 GHz. Not too shabby. Launched in December, 2012, this almost two-years-on-the-market handheld could well compete with today’s benchtop analyzers (without external mixers) in the frequency specification department.

Let’s take a look at just a few of the other specs associated with this instrument:

  • Resolution Bandwidth from 1 Hz to 10 MHz
  • Sweep mode speeds: Allow a resolution bandwidth of 30 kHz to 10 MHz with almost no impact on sweep speed
  • Dynamic range is >106 dB in 1 Hz bandwidth at 2.4 GHz
  • DANL is -160 dBm in 1 Hz bandwidth at 1 GHz (preamp on)
  • Phase noise is -104 dBc/Hz at 10 kHz offset at 1 GHz
  • Option of tracking generators from 100 kHz to 20 GHz (full-band)

Read more in the Used-Line T&M Specs pages as well as in the Related Articles below. Do check out the many capabilities available as options for the MS2720T. Not only all the signal analysis packages that a wireless engineer may need for the various data rates of carriers, but a vast selection of analyzers, such as power meter, channel scanner, GPS Receiver, and Interference Analyzer are available as options.

Used Anritsu MS2720T | used-line.comThe Spectrum Master™ MS2720T series provides field technicians and engineers with performance that rivals a benchtop spectrum analyzer. The MS2720T features a touchscreen, full-band tracking generators to 20 GHz, and best-in-class performance for dynamic range, DANL, phase noise, and sweep speed, providing unprecedented levels of spectrum monitoring, hidden signal detection, RF/microwave measurements, and testing of microwave backhauls and cellular signals.

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Anritsu suggests that this spectrum analyzer, at 8 pounds “fully loaded” is light enough to take up a tower. Well, you’re not going to get me up any tower, thank you very much, with or without a handheld spectrum analyzer.

CN Tower, Toronto, Canada

CN Tower, Toronto, Canada (Photo credit: P.Naumann)

I do have quite a bit of trouble picturing an RF engineer making his way up the CN Tower, for example, with a benchtop instrument, so there must be some brave engineers who scale the heights – with their handhelds!

If it was I who had the responsibility of handling this instrument, I would be very much inclined to avail myself of the Anritsu Remote Access Tool, which lets the user sit in the comfort of his lab or office while controlling the spectrum analyzer over a LAN connection, and analyze data with the Anritsu Master Software Tools – in-between his sips of coffee.

But then some folks are made for reaching for the sky, and others are not.

Anritsu webpage for Spectrum Master MS2720T

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Used-Line Tip: Searching for a Specific Model

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Do you ever find that because some equipment model numbers are so ubiquitous, when you search for them on your favorite search-engine or on Used-Line, they will return way too many results, most of them will not be connected to what you had in mind, and the model you were trying to find will only show up on page 7 of the results?

Of course, if you search for model Z3RA29-56L3 (not a real model number as far as I know), you are very likely to find what you are searching for on page 1 of 1. However if you search for model 123  (this is a real model number) on Used-Line, 300+ results could be returned, with a very low relevancy in terms of your personal search. The reason: Many manufacturers name their equipment models using numbers that include 123 in this exact sequence. Examples: 123, 12338, 1232A, 1230T, 123R, SPS-1230, 102-123, and so on.

As you must realize, searching for a model number made up of numbers exclusively – no letters – makes matters worse. The descriptions and synopses that accompany your results may contain your model number in a price tag or even in a specification. Take a look at this Used-Line listing for a Tektronix 492 spectrum analyzer, which showed up in the results of my search for a 123 Fluke ScopeMeter.

Search result based on specs in listing description.

Search result based on specs in listing description.

Do you see why my search pulled in this listing? The amplitude range is –123 dBm to +40 dBm.

So, what to do about this?

Well, you can code some new search algorithms and send them along with your resume to the recruiting department of your favorite search-engine.

Or, you can fiddle with various settings in your search engine to train it to guess what you are looking for. And, of course, in some search engines, you can use an advanced search function to search for an exact term. But this all takes a few steps.

So, take a look at what our developers at Used-Line have done to make searching a cinch.

Used-Line has reduced the number of steps typically required to narrow down a search –  to a single click. Here is how it works. We will use model 123 as an example.

Used-Line drop-down list for model #123 search

Drop-down list for model #123 search

  1. In the menu bar near the top of any page on Used-Line, start typing 123 in the text box that is prefilled with the words, Find Category or Model#.
  2. Wait for a second or less to view a drop-down list of all the models on Used-Line that contain the number 123, such as SEM123D, 1123A, 212359, and 011-0123-00.
  3. Select model number 123 from the list.

What we have actually done here is to select a specific model. When we previously searched for a 123 and simply waited for the results to come in, the system returned the 300+ models on Used-Line that contain the number, 123. Now, after picking the specific model number, 123, from a selection of suggested model numbers, the system returned 20 models – all exactly what we were searching for. Not only has our search been narrowed down – it has zoomed right into what we were looking for.

No more clicking back and forth between pages and pages of irrelevant search results.

Now you give it a try!

 

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Why not rent? (Part two of two)

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In the last blog, I introduced a  February 2013 Scope Junction article that delivers the results of a survey on scope rentals. Readers were asked how often they had rented an oscilloscope. Of the 152 users who responded, more than 53% answered in the negative – they had never rented a scope.

Part One of this blog discussed a couple of points to consider if you are thinking about renting or leasing equipment instead of purchasing. Affordability was weighed against cost-effectiveness and the number of variables that can impact the ultimate cost of an instrument . As well, predicting the future of the industry was considered a factor in rental decisions.

Here are a couple more considerations.

Flexibility. You can rent state-of-the-art equipment that your budget does not allow you to purchase. For specific projects with stringent high-end specification requirements, a short-term rental lets you perform specialized tasks that you normally would not be able to run without the unique instrumentation features or specifications required for them. And – without breaking the bank. Although the flexibility of this type of short-term rental is attractive, it does demand more than a comfort level with the specs in order to match those required by the project with the capabilities of the instrument you intend to rent.

Test-drive an instrument. While renting, you can gauge an instrument’s performance strengths and weaknesses in your lab. Many instrument dealerships offer both rental and leasing terms. After leasing for a particular time period, you may be offered purchasing options at reduced terms. At this point, you should be able to clearly assess the suitability of the instrument as a permanent fixture in your lab.

And now for a little bonus tidbit. Or should I call that tipbit?

How to Find Dealers that Rent Out Equipment on Used-Line.com

The Used-Line Dealer Directory lists more than 900 dealers. How do you locate those that do offer rental equipment as one of their services?

  1. On the Used-Line.com home page, click DEALER DIRECTORY in the column on the right side of the page.
  2. In the Dealer Directory, use the filter on the left side of the page to choose the type of equipment you need: T&M, Lab, or Semi.
  3. Narrow your search further by Location and by product Specialization.
  4. Open the Services list, then select Rentals to view all the companies that offer rentals in the type of equipment you need.

    DD Services with Rentals

    DD services with rentals

 


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Why not rent? (Part one of two)

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In a February 2013 Scope Junction article, Michael Dunn delivers the results of a survey on scope rentals. Readers were asked how often they had rented an oscilloscope. Of the 152 users who responded, more than 53% answered in the negative – they had never rented a scope.

I’m wondering – why not?

Well, I know that there is that warm, fuzzy feeling one gets from owning one’s own stuff. There’s also the Guiltfree Factor. If you own something, you don’t get that oh-no-it’s-not-mine reaction when you spill your morning coffee on the bezel.
But, emotional issues aside, what’s on the plus side for renting a scope – or any piece of test or laboratory equipment? Here are just a few well-known, but worth repeating, advantages of renting equipment.

Affordability. Rental can be more affordable than purchasing, particularly for short-term periods and if support and maintenance are included in the terms. However, the cost of both renting or purchasing equipment needs to be carefully calculated. There are many variables, including natural depreciation of the instrument, usage, the condition of the instrument (new, used, refurbished, calibrated), specifications, configurations, need for support and repair, and yes, even size. The cost of a portable spectrum analyzer, for example, cannot be calculated using the same formula as one would use to cost a roto-molding independent-arm machine. Every company must, of course, use its own formulae for calculating the cost-effectiveness of renting or purchasing equipment.

No need to be an industry prophet. When you purchase, you need to factor in the future. When you rent, you can, well, not ignore, but somewhat downplay the effects of depreciation, usage, repairs, growth and changes in the industry, and internal turbulence within your company. You need not spend too much time wondering how much dust your instrument may be gathering at the end of the warranty period, or whether it will still be happily chugging along. A child’s “I need it now” philosophy very much suits the rental option. A year down the line is not really significant because you can swap the unit, or simply not renew the rental contract.

Stay tuned for part two, in which I’ll talk about a couple more rental considerations, and more.


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Measurement of Harmonics using Spectrum Analyzers

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Occasionally I get into one of my more “techie” moods, and I feel I have to share with you an application note or white paper written by an engineer from one of the three or four big test and measurement equipment manufacturers. They really know their stuff and I think it’s worth sharing even if you don’t intend to own any of their equipment. (And maybe you do!)

In an application note (1EF78) on the measurement of harmonics, Rohde and Schwarz’ Dr. Florian Ramian discusses the theory of harmonics, problems in measuring the non-linear components of a circuit, and the advantages of the R&S®FSW signal/spectrum analyzer’s high pass filter for harmonic measurements.

R&S FSW Signal/Spectrum Analyzers

R&S FSW Series

He explains the need to isolate the harmonics generated by the measurement instrument from the harmonics of the device under test (DUT). Typically a spectrum analyzer is the measuring instrument of choice because of its ability to simultaneously display both the actual signal, and the harmonics of the signal. He describes how the high pass filters of the FSW preclude the need for further RF attenuation to the signal to reduce harmonic distortion, thus keeping the noise floor low, and increasing the sensitivity of the measurements.

That’s all I’m going to say about it. Take a look at Dr. Ramian’s discussion yourself in the Rohde & Schwarz application note (in PDF format).

If you want to take a look at the features and specs of one of the FSW’s, here’s the FSW43 on Used-Line.com.


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On Toy Telephones and Digital Test Sets

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Have you ever wondered why the ubiquitous toy telephone a toddler usually receives as a gift on his first birthday has a rotary dial and is shaped exactly like the communication device only his great-grandmother remembers using? Is there something about “ye olde” equipment that reminds us of the days when things consistently worked well?

author

author (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

The hardy rotary telephone rang bells in my mind recently when I read a reprinting of Benoit Leveille’s gripping 2009 tale about the effectiveness of state-of-the-art equipment versus the old tried-and-true, in EDN Network’s Tales from the Cube. In this story, the “ugly” sister, an old analog HP spectrum analyzer (could it have been the 8551A, which was introduced in 1964?) is the heroine of the story.

Leveille creates a tension-building saga that blends a repair technician’s worst nightmare—finding nothing wrong with the instrument—with a classic story-telling theme, the pauper’s triumph over the prince.

To discover how a $50,000 digital test set could not pick up a noise floor problem, which, while troubleshooting with the old “frequency-domain oscilloscope”, was found to be caused by a mere transistor gone wrong, visit the EDN Network and read “Hawk eyes, analog equipment trump expensive digital test set“.

Now I’m wondering why those toy telephones are usually painted in primary colors instead of black, but that’s a tale for another day.

See Also:
Spectrum Analyzers on Used-Line.com
Test Sets on Used-Line.com

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